Civil society condemns murder of Berta Cáceres

Networks and organizations across the Americas and Europe issue a statement condemning the assassination of the Honduran human rights activist Berta Cáceres.

Berta Cáceres, Lenca indigenous leader and coordinator of the Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH) was murdered yesterday at her residence in La Esperanza, Intibucá, Honduras. While expressing its deepest condolences to her family, civil society urges the Honduran authorities to invest all necessary resources to investigate, prosecute, punish those responsible and take appropriate remedy measures, including publicly dignifying the memory of Berta. The international community, the statement reads, should also “take all necessary measures to ensure that the Honduran State fulfill its human rights obligations.”

Arcoiris Association

Founded in 2003, Arcoíris is committed to empowering and informing the LGBTI community from Comayagüela and Tegucigalpa on issues of holistic health, the defence and promotion of human rights related to sexual diversity, advocacy, research and outreach. The populations they work with and who access their programs are lesbian and bisexual women, gay and bisexual men and transgender women and men (transsexual, transgender, transformist and transvestite). They also work with heterosexuals, the latter in terms of wider population to  raising awareness in order to challenge  stigmatisation and discrimination based on sexual orientation. Arcoíris is part of the Committee on Sexual Diversity and the Honduras UPR Platform and recently Donny Reyes, coordinator of the Association, was elected by representatives of civil society to join the National Council for the Protection of Human Rights as a deputy member.
 

Dina Meza

Dina Meza is a well-known independent Honduran journalist and defender of freedom of expression and of information. She investigates and reports human rights violations in such cases as the Bajo Aguán conflict and violations of freedom of expression. Dina Meza is currently a freelance journalist and the president of the Honduras PEN Centre.

WOMEN LEADERS (Women Defenders in Colombia)

Many women have transformed from victims of the conflict, to leaders fighting for the rights of their communities, and are currently playing a fundamental role in the peace process.

PBI has talked to women leaders all around Colombia for this special edition on women human rights defenders.

Berta Cáceres, Honduran human rights and environment activist, murdered.

Networks and organizations across the Americas and Europe issue a statement condemning the assassination of the Honduran human rights activist Berta Cáceres.

Berta Cáceres, Lenca indigenous leader and coordinator of the Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH) was murdered yesterday at her residence in La Esperanza, Intibucá, Honduras. While expressing its deepest condolences to her family, civil society urges the Honduran authorities to invest all necessary resources to investigate, prosecute, punish those responsible and take appropriate remedy measures, including publicly dignifying the memory of Berta. The international community, the statement reads, should also “take all necessary measures to ensure that the Honduran State fulfill its human rights obligations.”

Manika Jha

Manika JhaOne night in January 2009, a gang of men broke into the home of Manika Jha’s neighbour and fellow journalist Uma Singh, and knifed her to death. They scrawled a cross on Manika’s door, with the message that she would be next.

Manika writes on corruption, women’s rights and discrimination. In Nepal this is a dangerous profession if you are a man; as a young woman doubly so. Dhanusha district, where Manika is based, is one of the most volatile regions of Nepal. It is also very conservative, particularly when it comes to the role of women in society.

Association of Indigenous Women of Santa María Xalapán

Members of AMISMAXAJ visit the PBI house in Guatemala CitySince 2003, The association of Indigenous Women of Santa María Xalapán (AMISMAXAJ) has grown from a small group of rural women who met in secret and asked themselves “Do we have rights?” into a respected public organisation participating in debate on women’s and indigenous rights at a national level.

Claudia Julieta Duque

Investigative journalist Claudia Julieta Duque is a correspondent for the Colombian human rights radio station Radio Nizkor and a former researcher for the José Alvear Restrepo Lawyers' Collective (CCAJAR).

In more than 23 years as a journalist, she has investigated and reported on numerous high-profile cases, including those involving issues of forced disappearance, forced recruitment of children by legal and illegal armed groups, the impact of impunity and the right to justice, and infiltration of paramilitary groups in government agencies. 

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