• 8 August 2018
    9 August marks the International Day of Indigenous People, whose 2018 theme focuses on addressing the root causes of forced indigenous migration. The deteriorating human rights situation for rural communities in Guatemala shows that protecting indigenous activists is crucial. 
  • 25 July 2018
    "These defenders are part of a global movement to protect the planet. They are on the frontline of fighting climate change, preserving ecosystems and safeguarding human rights. They stand up for causes that benefit us all: sustainability, biodiversity and justice." - Global Witness2017 was the deadliest year on record for land and environmental defenders, according to a new report released on 24 July 2018 by NGO Global Witness.
  • 13 June 2018
    The situation for land rights defenders in Guatemala is seriously and rapidly deteriorating, according to alerts released by PBI Guatemala and other human rights organisations. Since 9 May, seven indigenous leaders and activists have been killed across the country.
  • 27 January 2017
    PBI Honduras has published its fourth edition of their newsletter, reflecting on human rights and the work of defenders in the country throughout 2016.
  • 28 October 2016
    On the October 20 in Tegucigalpa members of COPINH and other civil society organisations held a peaceful demonstration outside of the Public Prosecutors’ office to demand transparency and justice in the case of the murder of Berta Cáceres. The demonstrators faced violent repression by the police forces present. Police fired water cannon and tear gas at the protesters. Hundreds of people were affected by tear gas fumes as they attempted to flee the scene. Those who found themselves within the reach of the security forces were kicked and beaten with batons.
  • 9 August 2016
    International day of the world’s indigenous peoples represents an opportunity to reflect on the contribution made by indigenous communities around the globe. While the common narrative surrounding indigenous people often focuses on their vulnerability, PBI's experience working with grassroots community groups at the forefront of the struggle for land and environmental rights in Central and Latin America highlights that they are also important agents of change.
  • 16 March 2016
    In March 2016 Pedro Sicá, Guatemalan indigenous leader, visited London as part of a Europe wide speaker tour organised by PBI. Pedro is an indigenous Maya K’iche’ leader of the Cunén Community Council (CCC), a community organization for the defence of the land, natural resources and human rights. In the area of Cunén and northern Quiché, there are many social conflicts around hydroelectric projects, mining and high-voltage electricity pylons. PBI began accompanying CCC in 2010 due to the security risks faced by human rights defenders actively promoting the right to land, territory and natural resources in the region. 
  • 13 December 2015
    On Saturday 12 December 2015, delegates at the COP21 Paris Climate Conference signed the agreement that will form the core of the global response to climate change from the time it comes into force in 2020.While the deal was hailed by many leaders and commentators as a remarkable diplomatic success for its ambitious warming targets, representatives from indigenous nations around the world took to the streets of Paris to draw attention to the key clauses that had been removed: those that made binding commitments to the protection of human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples in climate change solutions. In the final text, all references to these rights were relegated to the non-binding, aspirational words of the preamble.
  • 25 August 2015
  • 25 June 2015
    In June 2015 Omar Jeronimo, coordinator of the Nuevo Dia Ch’orti Indigenous Association, visited London on a speaking tour organised by PBI UK.The Nuevo Dia Ch’orti Indigenous Association (CCCND) provide support and legal representation for indigenous Ch’orti communities in Guatemala’s Chiquimula region who have been working to strengthen community processes and oppose the construction of hydroelectric and mining projects on their ancestral land.

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